Tynt Meadow English Trappist Ale 11.2 oz

Item #4735
Shipping Wt. 1.50 lbs.
Availability: In Stock
NEW!

The first English Trappist Ale!

Brewed by: Mount Saint Bernard Abbey
Country: England, UK
Style: English Strong Ale
Color: Mahogany

ABV: 7.4%
Ratebeer.com rating: 97
BeerAdvocate.com rating: 91

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Tynt Meadow (ABV 7.4%) is an English Strong Ale brewed by the Trappist monks at Mount Saint Bernard Abbey, Charnwood Forest, Leicestershire. Their brewery was founded in 2017, and Tynt Meadow is the first English beer to receive the Authentic Trappist Products label.

Tynt Meadow is mahogany-colored, with a subtle, warm red hue, and a lasting beige head. Its aroma carries hints of dark chocolate, licorice, and rich fruit flavors. The beer is full-bodied, gently balancing the taste of dark chocolate, pepper, and fig. It leaves a warm and dry finish on the palate. Tynt Meadow is brewed with English barley and hops, using an English strain of yeast. It is twice-fermented, first in the tank, and then in the bottle. It should be stored in a cool, dark, quiet place.

Ratebeer.com rating: 97 (out of 100); 11.2 oz (capped) bottle.

Click to learn more about Trappist Ales
Mount Saint Bernard Abbey: Charnwood Forest, Leicestershire, England

Founded in 1835, Mount Saint Bernard Abbey was the first permanent monastery to be founded in England since the Reformation and is the only Trappist house in England. The monks brew the only Trappist beer in Britain, Tynt Meadow, named for the plot of land where the seven founding monks first lived.

The three focuses of monastic life at Mount St Bernard Abbey are prayer, work and reading with study (Lectio Divina). Their work includes the production of pottery, bookbinding, beekeeping and tending the vegetable garden and orchard. Until 2014 the monks ran a 200-acre dairy farm, but this was hit by falling milk prices, depriving the abbey of its principal source of revenue. In 2017 the monks established their brewery as an alternative enterprise, in line with the tradition of other monasteries in Europe.

As of 2018, the brewery is their principal field of labor. All the work, from brewing to bottling and packaging, is done by the monks. They keep the volume of production relatively small, just enough to meet their expenses and support their charitable commitments, as is typical of monastic breweries.